brintellex
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
  • Users Online: 162
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 48-53

Occupational therapy and advanced dementia: A practitioner survey


1 Department of Occupational Therapy, Tufts University, Medford; New England Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bedford, Massachusetts, USA
2 Department of Occupational Therapy, Tufts University, Medford; New England Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bedford, Massachusetts; American Occupational Therapy Association, Bethesda, Maryland, USA

Correspondence Address:
Megan E Gately
Department of Occupational Therapy, Tufts University, 574 Boston Avenue, Medford - 02155, Massachusetts
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jgmh.jgmh_41_16

Rights and Permissions

Aims: There is a gap in research about the role of occupational therapy (OT) in the United States with clients with advanced dementia. The purpose of this study is to explore OT practice with clients with advanced dementia within the United States by surveying practitioners. Study questions addressed interventions, including frequency and perceived effectiveness, intervention priorities, and barriers to practice. Methods: Survey methodology was employed to obtain the practice experience of the United States OT practitioners working with clients with advanced dementia. Results: Respondents (n = 95) were mostly occupational therapists with 10 years of practice experience, some reporting dual roles as administrators or fieldwork educators, working in long-term care settings. Respondents spent minimal time per week with clients with advanced dementia, providing primarily one-to-one interventions with varied perceived effectiveness. A wide range of interventions were aemployed. Therapist and perceived facility intervention priorities differed. The most frequently reported barrier to practice was client factors, followed by institutional barriers. Thematic analysis of qualitative questions further elucidates the practice experience of respondents. Conclusions: Findings provide insight into occupational therapy practice in the United States with clients with advanced dementia. This study describes interventions utilized with this population, barriers to practice, and perceived effectiveness of interventions. Qualitative entries describe care approaches for this population and challenges to providing care. While this study adds to the evidence base for occupational therapy's role in serving clients with advanced dementia, there remains a need for more research in this area.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7956    
    Printed229    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded804    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 3    

Recommend this journal